HMCS Chaudiere

Located in Sechelt Inlet off Kunichin Point this is an excellent dive for all avid wreck divers. Laying on it’s side means this is a deep dive with the stern at 55fsw and bow at 105fsw depending on tides. Access holes have been cut into the hull and super structure to allow access to the three diveable decks. This 366ft vessel offers many areas for exploration and interior penetration to those qualified. Glassy tunicates are everywhere on this wreck, initially appearing in the first 6 months of being underwater, and this has only attracted more marine life. The Chaudiere is a destroyer escort built during the post wars years along with a number of other vessels of this class.

Visibility in this area usually averages 30 – 50ft and has been known to exceed 100ft. This wreck is only accessible by boat. The wreck is marked but 3 yellow marker buoys at the bow, amidships and the stern.In 1992 the HMCS Chaudiere was the first destroyer-escort to be sunk to form an artificial reef. Since then “The Chaud”, as she is affectionately known, has become home to a diverse community of marine creatures. Having deservedly gained a reputation as one of the best wreck dives on the Pacific Coast, “The Chaud” gets more amazing with each year.

Suncoast Diving is the Official Charter and Caretaker of the HMCS Chaudiere, having been involved from the initial planning, cleanup and sinking to the ongoing maintenance of the ship and site. The 366-ft ship settled on her port side. The deck at the stern is 50-60ft deep, at the superstructure is about 80′ and at the bow is 90-100 ft. The bottom at the stern is about 80-ft, at midship is about 110-ft, beneath the guns is about 140′ and the bow hangs over a ledge. Large, yellow cautionary buoys (X) are attached to the ship at the stern, mid-ship and bow. Orange and white mooring cans (X) are attached to the ship just forward of the superstructure and mid-mortar bay.

18 Responses to HMCS Chaudiere

  1. Wayne Reardon says:

    It is good to see my old ship is still serving this country, although in a different capacity than she had when I served aboard her from 1969 to 1972.

    Bravo Zulu on the site.

  2. KennyG says:

    Wayne,
    Hello there, and thank you so much for your comment. I did not serve on the ship, but I did do some training on her while she was in Esquimalt. I just retired from 20 years in the Navy…so it is strange seeing her on the bottom…but yes she is still serving.

    Thank you once again.

    ken

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  8. Gordon McIntosh says:

    I served on the ship (paywrite) when we took her from Halifax through the Panama Canal to Esquimalt back in 1972 for a complete refit. Lots of memories….rest in peace

  9. KennyG says:

    Hello Gordon,
    Thank you for the comment. Cool that you served on the ship. I just recently retired from 20 years in the Navy. I was on her while she was a Harbour Trianing platform in Esquimalt. You should check out the video we did on the ship. I have it on You Tube, here is the link

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HB1Ajh67nxo

    Kind Regards

    KennyG

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  11. Arthur Taylor says:

    great seeing her again Radar plotter from 68-70 then on to the the mackenzie. both doing well as reefs obviously. She was my first ship glad they both serve a pupose besides razor blade like the “bonnie”

  12. KennyG says:

    Cool…I was the morphed trade NCIOP or 275…which has been changed again. Yes the reefs are doing awesome…lots of marine life, little impact on the environment…and great tourist attraction!!

  13. Stuart Doran says:

    Chaudiere was my first ship, served on her from Sept 72 – May 74. I was a proud member of the decomissioning crew. After we paid her off the crew moved to the Saskatchewan where I remained until 1980. Seems like every ship I sailed on is now a reef, which is much better than being scrapped. I remember fondly hearing of the St. Laurent sinking on her way to the wrecking yard…should be the fate of all fighting ships.

  14. KennyG says:

    Hey there,
    Thank you for your comments. I know what you mean. The Chaud was a training platform in Esquimalt when I joined, and my first ship was Saskatchewan, and my last west coast ship was Huron and she was sunk in a sinkex a couple of years back.

  15. private Marcoux 156 says:

    Was a stuart on board, 1969-70; I learn english by the same time visiting, Honolulu ; St-Francisco, celebrating Chinese New-Years St-Diego, Tiwana ( Mexique ) Portland Oregon for the rose festival, and the summer time whit the Governer of B.C. visiting indien post ;like Kitimat etc etc,some thing bother me a bit, why no body talk about the HMCS Colombia, if my memories still good the Colombia was her sister, So i really like my time i was on that ship, lots of great time, and some of you probably will remember the tavern right out side of the yard was call i thing The Tudor House.Am from Quebec; ( ringo-@live.ca ) best rhum of the world

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  17. Ernest Dort says:

    I was drafted to H.M.C.S. Chaudière for pre commission trials and remained after she was commissioned.. Had first Xmas at sea on Her.. HATE TO SEE HER ON THE BOTTOM… however better than to know she was scrapped

  18. I sailed on the Chaudiere in 1967 as a Reserve (Bos’n). We de-commissioned her that year. Sailed through the Panama Canal and up to the West Coast.

    What a trip! I remember getting very hammered in one of the ports and having to be taken back to the ship, carried onboard and having a sentry posted by my bunk until I sobered up. Young, foolish and immature!

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