Tag Archives: Decompression Procedures

Minimum Deco Tables

GUE

Well everyone here at UWE have had to ask the question, what the heck is everyone doing diving on a bottom timer, doing multi level dives and yet have no apparent plan.  After asking a few divers, I have since discovered this set of tables called Minimum Deco Tables printed by DIR/GUE.  After doing some research it sure sounds interesting, and I am still going through the how to use file, but it still appears that this is to be a square dive profile, which of course no one seems to be doing.

Since returning to Vancouver to work, I have run in to a large number of people who have been bent, or have suffered a DCS since I have been back to the city, and I have to wonder if this is the reason. Not that the tables are wrong but maybe the divers are not doing it correctly which I think is more the situation.   Does everyone know what a square dive profile actually means?  That means the planned depth and time is it, there is no multi level diving it, no new depths, the time is the time…and we do not make it up as it goes.

Dive computers, now I must say, I do not follow my computer blindly, I wear two as I have one that has failed on more then one occasion, but then again I am diving a computer dive, a multi level computer dive which means, I have custom tables being made for me as I dive.  If the algorithm that is in the computer correct, I should be, or there should be a modicum of safety built into it.  Especially if I dive my limits conservatively.

If you go to our Downloads Page you will find the DIR/GUE Minimum Deco Tables, for your review.  Be sure to check back in the next couple of days as we will add to the site how to use the tables.

Opinions?

Re-Compression Tour

VGH Re-Compression Chamber

UWE and Ocean Quest Dive Centre, had a tour at VGH’s Re-compression tour hosted by Dr Harrison.  I would have to say it was a very informative evening, though many of the things discussed I had already been taught.  But it is always good to have a review and also to confirm I was taught correctly in the first place.

One of the things I found to be rather disturbing was the number of fatalities were directly contributed to divers not being able to retrieve their regulator when it was out of their mouths.  Now as an Instructor who has taught many many open water courses, it made me think back and remember how many students had been having difficulty with this skill.  I also realized in the training nothing was ever said about just simply pulling your alternate air source off it’s holder and use that until you could successfully find your primary.

The other thing I took away from the tour, was how many people hurt themselves due to poor judgement, and making poor decisions.  The funny thing I see every day, divers who are diving more advanced dive gear, diving to depths they may not be as ready for, and simply take for granted all be it diving is fun, it is still a dangerous sport if not respected.  So, I think what was really being said, check your ego at the shore, practice your skills, and stay current.  Staying current means get out and dive. If you are an open water diver, take your advanced diver course, never stop striving for knowledge, and remember no one person knows everything, be open to learn new things even if it is from someone who is a lower level of diver.

If you ever get a chance to take a re-compression tour go, it is well worth it.


New Decompressions Diver

[singlepic id=259 w=320 h=240 mode=watermark float=left]UWE would like to congratulate Bruno P. for his successful completion of the TDI Decompressions Procedures course.   Last night Bruno and I headed out to the HMCS Chaudiere to complete his certifying dive.  Our dive plan was for 150 ft, for 25 minutes, which was a bit deeper then what we actually did for our dive.  In the end, the bottom time worked to 30 minutes with a max depth of 135ft.

As we left the bottom to our first decompression stop we had a short 14 minute obligation which was cut in half when we reached the 20 foot mark where we did our gas switch to 100 percent O2.  Over all the dive time was 57 minutes.  The visibility on the Chaudiere was about 50 foot once we hit the 90 ft mark.

Diving with the Master!

[singlepic id=107 w=320 h=240 mode=watermark float=left]Yesterday certainly turned out to be an amazing day,  I had the opportunity to dive with Tony Holmes, my mentor the guy who taught me everything I know about diving and what a pleasure it was!!

We originally had a charter booked headed out to the HMCS CHAUDIERE, and as always I was looking forward to diving it, plus I would have the chance to get more footage of the wreck, something I certainly would not turn down….but who to dive with.  The charter was going to be a Tec Dive, with two on doubles and one on a rebreather….and I certainly was not in the frame of mind to do a long cold hang at 20 feet.  Out of the blue, Tony called the shop and said he was hoping to get out for a dive or two for the weekend, talk about timing!!

Once everything was loaded on the boat, it was off to the boat launch and the trip up the inlet.  With the sun being out, it made you think of the soon to be summer, though the air was still pretty crisp as we skimmed along the wave tops.  Once on the dive site, we tied to the stern line on the wreck, and began getting the Tec guys read…first in was Owen on the rebreather, then Keith and Jessica.   As they disappeared into what appeared pea soup, Tony and I prepared for our entry.  Determined not to hang at the 20 foot mark on a long deco, away we went.  Happily I slide into the follow position on Tony, and the tour began!

We swam the distance of the wreck and slide up through the hole at the 130ft mark, just back from the bow which leads into the forward crews heads and wash place, from there we went up through the door on Berma Road that takes you into One and Two Mess.  Normally once in the Mess we would ascend through the exit point which is overhead, but on this dive Tony decided to head straight into an opening that leads into the forepeak which eventually lead to the outside of the wreck.  This turned out to be an excellent penetration, and I was able to get some good footage, though I am pretty sure this is where my troubles began.  Since we were in the higher profile 120 cuft steel tanks I got my valve caught on the hatch combing, and had to wiggle through the opening.  Unbeknown to me, this must be the point where my 8 pound weight pouch got caught and dropped.  As when I got through the opening I was very light all of a sudden and had to dump some air from the BCD.  Though not a big problem at this point…that would not be the case when I had to maintain my depth on what was going to be a 16 minute decompression stop.

Once we came out of this penetration we headed up and over the bow of the CHAUDIERE, where we got our first glimpse of Owen on his Megladon Rebreather, it always amazes me how quiet they are.  We headed off to the penetration at the bridge where we would go in the lower hole on the bridge roof, and ascend up through the brdige to the Ops Room ladder which leads into ops, and through the Sonar control room, our exitpoint is overhead that leads out through an opening on the stardboard side of the boat.  As we proceeded aft and to our ascent line we did two more penetrations, one which was new for me, and then the final one on the stern, and out to the ascent line.

As we started up to our first decompression stop it was obvious this was not going to be a routine hold for me, as the I was about 8 pounds two light, and I had to wrap myself around the ascent line in order to maintain the 20 then 10 foot stops.  Thankfully it was only 16 minutes of a hold.

As always another great dive, I certainly have missed diving with Tony, something I hope we will get the chance to do again in the near future.  If you are interested in doing the Wreck Specialty or Advanced Nitrox/Decompressions Procedures go to the Courses page on this site, and see what it is all about!

9 mile Tec Dive

[singlepic=137,320,240,watermark,right]Uwe and Suncoast Diving was up to 9 mile point doing another Tec dive.  Neil and Mike were up from Vancouver to do another of their Technical dives.  Though we had a later start then normal overall it was well worth the wait.

Upon arriving at 9 mile we could quickly tell how good the visibility was going to be.  Tide was high, but in 30 feet of water we could clear see the bottom while we were still sitting in the boat.  Due to the cold surface temperatures we decided to cut back the lenght of the bottom time so we would not have to pay for it back at 20 feet, in the middle of the cold surface layer.  Sam was the dive leader for todays dive, and she did a wonderful job getting the group to the bottom and headed down the crack to the deep wall.  Once [singlepic=135,320,240,watermark,left]down, we settled into a nice easy swim so we could enjoy the sites, the topography at 9 mile is a amazing.  The wall is covered with tube worms, sea cucumbers and other marine life.

Overall the dive was good, good visibility!!  Uwe and Suncoast Diving is going to be up the inlet on Saturday to do a wreck course and Drysuit course.  If your interested be sure to stop by the shop and sign up!!

New Decompression Diver

[singlepic=102,320,240,watermark,left]Uw Explorers wants to send out our congratulations to Jeremy Chesworth on completing the Advanced Nitrox and Decompression procedures course yesterday!  We planned to challenge Jeremy with a dive to 170fsw off 9 mile point.

Monday night had everyone hard at work preparing decompression mixes for the dive, while some prepared the decompression schedule for the dive.  Once completed we broke for the evening with the agreement to meet early the next day so we could get everything together and out to the dive site.[singlepic=138,320,240,watermark,right]

Once on site, we preped and rolled into the water….did our bubble checks…and then started our descent.  As we dropped through the 50 foot mark we could tell there was a bit of a current.  So our intial swim was going to be a but harder then expected but there were no problems as we finally arrived at the scar that leads to the deep drop off!  Visiblity was at least 150 feet, and water temps were still good for decompression!!

Overall it was a great dive…interested in becoming a Tec Diver…be sure to check our courses tab right here at the website!!