Tag Archives: Tec Diving

Tec 40 Training

Uwe and Ocean Quest went out on the last weekend of July and did Dive 1 and Dive 2 of the Tec 40 Training class.   The conditions were very good for the training, visibility good and little water movement.  Greg laid the bottom line and then the ascent line.  Once everything in place the skills circuit began with some bottle drills, hovering drills and then the valve drills.  The big skill being looked at throughout the dive was awareness and for the most part everyone did very well.

We are going to be back in the classroom this week and then the Ocean for dives 3 and 4, which of course will be more skills, and then the running of schedules with simulated decompression.  We are lucky that we have a talented set of divers whom are doing a great job and I know they will complete the training easily.  Well done to everyone and I am looking forward to diving with you all very soon!

If you are interested in taking your Tec 40 Training, be sure to contact us either Here or at Ocean Quest

 

Are you Prepared??

This is from a poster that was created by the famous Cave Explorer Sheck Exley;

Sheck Exley What If Chart....
Sheck Exley

Before the Dive, What if…;

  • The gas company put the wrong gas in the cylinders you fill from?
  • The wrong grade of helium is in them?
  • THere are impurities in the gas?
  • You miscalculate your mixtures and have too much oxygen?
  • Too little oxygen?
  • Too much Nitrogen?
  • Too much Helium?
  • The for mixing is wrong?
  • The filling temperatures are different?
  • The dive shop filling your tanks allows the gas to bleed back into their bank system?
  • Your cylinders contain flammable materials and you put in pure oxygen?
  • The dive shop tops your deep tanks with bad air?
  • A pinhole leak allows the helium to leak but other gases remain?
  • Your get the cylinders mixed up while filling?

One the Descent, What if…;

  • You do not have enough oxygen when you submerge?
  • Your depth gauge reads shallow?
  • A tank you thought had trimix was really nitrox, etc?
  • You over breath your regulator?
  • You have a delay before ascending?
  • You have a delay on the way down?
  • You have to exert a lot on the bottom?
  • You have a five minute line entanglement etc, on the bottom?
  • You lose your dive partner on the bottom?
  • You get blown from the dive site?
  • You lose your mask?

During Decompression, What if…;

  • The decompression tables you have don’t work?
  • You lose your decompression tables?
  • You lose your watch?
  • You lose your depth gauge?
  • You run out of decompression gas?
  • You drop one of your decompression cylinders?
  • Some steals on of your decompression cylinders?
  • Your decompression cylinders have leaked?
  • You are delayed at a decompression stop?
  • Danger from hazardous marine life keeps you from completing your decompression?
  • Your drysuit floods?
  • You get hypothermia?
  • You get the bends

These are all the situations one should think of when Technical Diving…and be sure you can accept the risks!! Otherwise do not do it!!

New Decompression Divers

[singlepic id=282 w=320 h=240 mode=watermark float=left]UWE is excited to announce that Peter M has successfully completed his Advanced Nitrox, and Decompression Procedures training.  He arrived from Denver early last week, and we got hard at it.  The first day had a steep learning curve, where Peter was shown how to set up the Doubles, and we prepped with one stage bottle.  Once we had everything set up it was off to Coopers Green where we did a marathon dive that was filled with almost every skill that is needed to dive in the Technical sense.

On our second day, we did dual stage bottle skills, no mask drills and bag drills. As in the first day the learn curve was very steep.  This week had us doing our first decompression Dives, with the first one in Tuwanek, and then the second on at the HMCS CHAUDIERE.  Peter was certified on Wednesday, and this Saturday has us heading to the Power Lines for a dip to 170 feet.  Great times ahead!!

New Decompressions Diver

[singlepic id=259 w=320 h=240 mode=watermark float=left]UWE would like to congratulate Bruno P. for his successful completion of the TDI Decompressions Procedures course.   Last night Bruno and I headed out to the HMCS Chaudiere to complete his certifying dive.  Our dive plan was for 150 ft, for 25 minutes, which was a bit deeper then what we actually did for our dive.  In the end, the bottom time worked to 30 minutes with a max depth of 135ft.

As we left the bottom to our first decompression stop we had a short 14 minute obligation which was cut in half when we reached the 20 foot mark where we did our gas switch to 100 percent O2.  Over all the dive time was 57 minutes.  The visibility on the Chaudiere was about 50 foot once we hit the 90 ft mark.

Advanced Nitrox

Uwe would like to congratulate Bruno P for his successful completion of the Advanced Nitrox course. Bruno has been extremely active diving with UWE and SCDC, as well he has been working towards his Advanced Nitrox and Decompression Procedures certification.

It was late in the afternoon, and we were gearing up for what was to be an extremely successful dive on Pipers Point. Visibility has been a little short but we sure lucked out. There is some large pieces of plankton in the water, but for the most part visibility was easily 50 – 60 feet. The dive was great…we saw plenty of marine life, though not large stuff, but there was some Buffalo Sculpin and some nudi’s.

Be sure to check back, as the video of some of the marine life we saw will be posted in the next day or two. Once again well done to Bruno P. Interested in taking some dive courses? Stop by the Courses Page right here at UWE, and see what we have to offer!

Video Credit: Special thanks to Red Hat Divers for their video of the NOTOX Gas Switch

Diving with the Master!

[singlepic id=107 w=320 h=240 mode=watermark float=left]Yesterday certainly turned out to be an amazing day,  I had the opportunity to dive with Tony Holmes, my mentor the guy who taught me everything I know about diving and what a pleasure it was!!

We originally had a charter booked headed out to the HMCS CHAUDIERE, and as always I was looking forward to diving it, plus I would have the chance to get more footage of the wreck, something I certainly would not turn down….but who to dive with.  The charter was going to be a Tec Dive, with two on doubles and one on a rebreather….and I certainly was not in the frame of mind to do a long cold hang at 20 feet.  Out of the blue, Tony called the shop and said he was hoping to get out for a dive or two for the weekend, talk about timing!!

Once everything was loaded on the boat, it was off to the boat launch and the trip up the inlet.  With the sun being out, it made you think of the soon to be summer, though the air was still pretty crisp as we skimmed along the wave tops.  Once on the dive site, we tied to the stern line on the wreck, and began getting the Tec guys read…first in was Owen on the rebreather, then Keith and Jessica.   As they disappeared into what appeared pea soup, Tony and I prepared for our entry.  Determined not to hang at the 20 foot mark on a long deco, away we went.  Happily I slide into the follow position on Tony, and the tour began!

We swam the distance of the wreck and slide up through the hole at the 130ft mark, just back from the bow which leads into the forward crews heads and wash place, from there we went up through the door on Berma Road that takes you into One and Two Mess.  Normally once in the Mess we would ascend through the exit point which is overhead, but on this dive Tony decided to head straight into an opening that leads into the forepeak which eventually lead to the outside of the wreck.  This turned out to be an excellent penetration, and I was able to get some good footage, though I am pretty sure this is where my troubles began.  Since we were in the higher profile 120 cuft steel tanks I got my valve caught on the hatch combing, and had to wiggle through the opening.  Unbeknown to me, this must be the point where my 8 pound weight pouch got caught and dropped.  As when I got through the opening I was very light all of a sudden and had to dump some air from the BCD.  Though not a big problem at this point…that would not be the case when I had to maintain my depth on what was going to be a 16 minute decompression stop.

Once we came out of this penetration we headed up and over the bow of the CHAUDIERE, where we got our first glimpse of Owen on his Megladon Rebreather, it always amazes me how quiet they are.  We headed off to the penetration at the bridge where we would go in the lower hole on the bridge roof, and ascend up through the brdige to the Ops Room ladder which leads into ops, and through the Sonar control room, our exitpoint is overhead that leads out through an opening on the stardboard side of the boat.  As we proceeded aft and to our ascent line we did two more penetrations, one which was new for me, and then the final one on the stern, and out to the ascent line.

As we started up to our first decompression stop it was obvious this was not going to be a routine hold for me, as the I was about 8 pounds two light, and I had to wrap myself around the ascent line in order to maintain the 20 then 10 foot stops.  Thankfully it was only 16 minutes of a hold.

As always another great dive, I certainly have missed diving with Tony, something I hope we will get the chance to do again in the near future.  If you are interested in doing the Wreck Specialty or Advanced Nitrox/Decompressions Procedures go to the Courses page on this site, and see what it is all about!